telecommunications

Changes in the telecoms landscape and their implications for universal, affordable access to communication in Africa
Changes in the telecoms landscape and their implications for universal, affordable access to communication in Africa 26 September 2018 APCNews

What are the most relevant changes in the telecommunications landscape and their implications for achieving universal, affordable access to communication in Africa? This was the main focus of a workshop organised by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) and the Communications Regulators’ Association of Southern Africa (CRASA) on 9 September 2018. Held as a pre-event to the 2018 ITU Telecom World in Durban, South Africa, the workshop featured high-level analysis of the teleco...

Inside the Information Society: Competition – what happened to telecommunications?
Inside the Information Society: Competition – what happened to telecommunications? 09 April 2018 David Souter

Last week I wrote about the relationship between innovation and regulation in communications. I identified six areas of that relationship which I said I’d write about over the next few months (along with other issues). First up, this week and next, is competition. This week some history and ‘points of principle’; next week, some implications for today/tomorrow. (The history, of course, must necessarily be simplified. I’ve aimed to give the gist.) Once upon a time there were monopolies...

Internet blackout in Niger:  Niger’s dependence on the damaged Beninese fibre optic cable
Internet blackout in Niger: Niger’s dependence on the damaged Beninese fibre optic cable 13 October 2009 LC

Internet blackoutSince July 2009, Niger and its neighbouring countries such as Benin, Togo and Nigeria have suffered an internet blackout owing to damage to the undersea SAT-3 cable, which links Europe to South Africa via several West African countries, giving them access to high-speed internet. The SAT-3 cable has no landing point in Niger, which is landlocked, but it does land in Benin, a bo...

It’s not enough to have a pushy broadband policy in Tanzania
It’s not enough to have a pushy broadband policy in Tanzania 13 October 2009 John Mireny

High speed internet cablesLike its East African neighbours, Tanzania shares an unwavering faith in high-speed broadband. Broadband, the story goes, will be the panacea to myriad societal woes – including poverty, poor education and health services, and a lack of government services. Optical fibre running through the heart of the country has the potential to change the country’s social and e...

Communication for influence in Central, East and West Africa (CICEWA): Collected research and articles
Communication for influence in Central, East and West Africa (CICEWA): Collected research and articles 24 September 2009 APC

The landing of undersea telecommunications cables on the east coast of Africa in 2009 – starting with Seacom and The East African Marine System (TEAMS) and to be followed in 2010 by the Eastern Africa Submarine Cable System (EASSy) – creates an important opportunity for the countries of East Africa to develop affordable broadband access to the internet for all. However, this opportunity ta...

Bringing affordable telecommunications services to Uganda: A policy narrative and analysis
Bringing affordable telecommunications services to Uganda: A policy narrative and analysis 23 September 2009 Wairagala Wakabi

The liberalisation of Uganda’s telecoms sector came with a string of policy, regulatory and political failures, particularly related to the privatisation of the incumbent Uganda Posts and Telecommunications Corporation (UPTC), which led to the formation of Uganda Telecom (UTL). Delays in privatising UPTC (from now on referred to in most instances as UTL), the failure to attract the desired nu...

A review of telecommunications policy and challenges in Rwanda
A review of telecommunications policy and challenges in Rwanda 23 September 2009 Albert Nsengiyumva and Emmanuel Habumuremyi

The period after the 1994 genocide marked a moment of fundamental change in Rwandan communications. The government embarked on a policy that aimed to increase connectivity as a spur to development. This meant that the sole state-owned telecommunication company at the time, Rwandatel, would be treated differently by setting up an independent regulatory body known as the Rwanda Utilities Regulato...

Benin: Where mobile users carry  3, 4, even 5 SIM cards to make a call
Benin: Where mobile users carry 3, 4, even 5 SIM cards to make a call 28 May 2009 LC

One cell phone, five SIM cards In 1997, the people of Benin were definitely ready for the arrival of cellular phones, referred to as GSMs in the area (GSM stands for Global System for Mobile communication, a specific mobile standard). The fixed telephone was not widely adopted due to a lack of bandwidth and of technology adequate enough to allow the volume of connections necessary to serve Beni...

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