censorship

Self-censorship in Pakistani media
Self-censorship in Pakistani media 09 May 2018 Media Matters for Democracy

As many as 88% of Pakistani journalists said they self-censor in their professional work and are most likely to hold back information related to religious and security matters in their reporting and personal conversations, according to new research by APC member Media Matters for Democracy (MMfD). The study, Surrendering to Silence: An Account of self-censorship among Pakistani journalists , launched during World Press Freedom Day, is based on a survey of 156 journali...

Media Matters for Democracy: Surrendering to silence in Pakistan
Media Matters for Democracy: Surrendering to silence in Pakistan 03 May 2018 Media Matters for Democracy

Surrendering to Silence: An account of self-censorship among Pakistani journalists is the latest publication by APC member Media Matters for Democracy on the state of freedom of expression and censorship among journalists in Pakistan. This study sets out to test the claims of self-censorship in the Pakistani news media through a survey of journalists working in the country. The study provides a rare glimpse at the extent and contours of contemporary self-censorship among Pakistani j...

Sexuality and the internet: Findings from the global survey (2017)
Sexuality and the internet: Findings from the global survey (2017) 10 February 2018 Bruno Zilli and Horacio Sivori

At three different times over the past four years, the EROTICS project: An Exploratory Research on Sexuality and the Internet, by the APC Women’s Rights Programme, sent out a questionnaire to its worldwide network of gender and sexuality activists, advocates, professionals and scholars, to learn about the role of information and communication technologies in their work. The survey was particu...

EROTICS Global Survey 2017: Sexuality, rights and internet regulations
EROTICS Global Survey 2017: Sexuality, rights and internet regulations 19 December 2017 Mariana Palumbo and Delfina Schenone Sienra

The EROTICS project looks at the impact of regulatory frameworks and control mechanisms on the actual lived practices, experiences and concerns of internet users in the exercise of their sexual rights. At its seminal stage, five case studies showed that while increasing online activity exposes users to certain risks and threats, individuals and collectives are successful in developing means of ...

Joint written statement submitted by APC to the 35th session of the Human Rights Council: Criminalisation of online expression in Asia
Joint written statement submitted by APC to the 35th session of the Human Rights Council: Criminalisation of online expression in Asia 15 May 2017

The Association for Progressive Communications (APC) and organisations supporting this joint statement welcome the report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, Mr. David Kaye, to be presented at the 35th session of the Human Rights Council (HRC). We also welcome the Special Rapporteur’s timely attention paid to network shu...

The government and the Association of Internet Providers block access to websites in Ecuador
The government and the Association of Internet Providers block access to websites in Ecuador 14 April 2016 APC

UPDATE: 18 April 2016: AEPROVI has issued a statement with their position in relation to this case. On 28 March 2014, users in Ecuador reported accessibility issues to Google and YouTube websites. The reason for the outage was not known at the time. Two years later, on 14 April 2016, a leaked document surfaced that explains those websites were systematically blocked. According to a leaked inte...

Examining Internet Freedom in Latin America: Paraguay country report
Examining Internet Freedom in Latin America: Paraguay country report 27 March 2016 Maricarmen Sequera Buzarquis, TEDIC

Paraguay experienced state and private surveillance during the military dictatorship of Alfredo Stroessner (1954-1989). However, the democratic period is not exempt from similar practices or new forms of abusive intrusion into the lives of citizens. This report analyses surveillance and violations of basic rights that continue in this democratic period in Paraguay, in other forms including surv...

Examining Internet Freedom in Latin America: Mexico country report
Examining Internet Freedom in Latin America: Mexico country report 27 March 2016 Luis Fernando García and Vladimir Chorny, R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales

Mexico’s Constitution recognises the right of access to information and communication technologies (ICTs). However, the population has a low rate of access to the internet. The law recognises net neutrality, including the principles of non-discrimination and free access. However, there is documentary evidence of practices that run contrary to these principles. The Federal Telecommunications I...

Examining Internet Freedom in Latin America: Costa Rica country report
Examining Internet Freedom in Latin America: Costa Rica country report 27 March 2016 Cooperativa Sulá Batsú

Costa Rica has laws that recognise and protect the following rights: privacy, freedom of expression, honour, freedom of conscience, religion, association and assembly, and non-discrimination. The laws are backed up by national doctrine and jurisprudence, that is, judicial literature and sentences that recognise and mould an environment for the protection of these rights. Most of these rights ar...

Examining Internet Freedom in Latin America: Colombia country report
Examining Internet Freedom in Latin America: Colombia country report 27 March 2016 Juan Diego Castañeda and Amalia Toledo, Fundación Karisma

Although Colombia has challenges guaranteeing internet access to all its population, the internet has become an essential tool for the development of many activities and the exercise of fundamental rights like freedom of expression and access to knowledge. Legislation and jurisprudence applicable to the internet have not been systematic, and this has often had major effects on whether the inter...

« Go back