Internet rights

V for Vale: 10 year journey of TBTT! campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina
V for Vale: 10 year journey of TBTT! campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina 13 January 2017 Lamia Kosovic

Initiated in 2006, the campaign Take Back the Tech! in Bosnia and Herzegovina has greatly contributed to raising awareness of how ICTs are connected to violence against women, and it has strengthened the ICT capacity of women’s rights advocates, while creating original and varied content. At the same time, BiH Take Back the Tech! and their campaigners have worked actively on building a community to strategize around eliminating violence against women through digital platforms. This year, al...

Harnessing the internet to realise labour rights in Cambodia: Interview with Alexandra Demetrianova
Harnessing the internet to realise labour rights in Cambodia: Interview with Alexandra Demetrianova 13 January 2017 Radhika Radhakrishnan

Do internet campaigns work? This is what Alexandra Demetrianova reflects upon in her research for GISWatch about labour rights violations in garment factories of Cambodia. In this interview, she discusses how the internet has played a key role in the struggles of garment factory workers (mostly female) and trade unionists to demand for an increase in their minimum wage. She also speaks about the internet’s potential in humanising the garment industry and changing consumer consciousness acro...

Role of internet in realising sexual and reproductive rights in Uganda: Interview with Allana Kembabazi
Role of internet in realising sexual and reproductive rights in Uganda: Interview with Allana Kembabazi 13 January 2017 Tarryn Booysen

The Global Information Society Watch (GISWatch) 2016 focuses on economic, social, cultural rights (ESCRs) and the link it has to the internet. Does the internet enable or disable the realisation of ESCRs? The internet is often linked to issues such as censorship, privacy and cyber bullying. But very few question whether the internet could actually be linked to everyday basic needs. In a world t...

Online privacy through a gendered lens in Bangladesh
Online privacy through a gendered lens in Bangladesh 13 January 2017 Farhana Akter

The ever-growing advancement of information technology is not without perils. Online privacy has been at stake for a while now and the protection of personal information is under attack. We no longer have control over our private data. It is now a commodity up for sale to the highest bidders. And a repository for the state actors who are suspiciously going through it to determine if we can be t...

The (mobile) games women play
The (mobile) games women play 13 January 2017 Neha Mathews

This piece was originally published by Deep Dives as part of the series Sexing the Interwebs While I was growing up in the sleepy town of Pune, many teenage girls made the most of their first cell phones by sending coy, flirty texts to their boyfriends and making plans about which Café Coffee Day to hang out at after school. Those blessed with early smartphones also had the privilege of upload...

[READING LIST] Gender, Race, Sexuality and Surveillance
[READING LIST] Gender, Race, Sexuality and Surveillance 13 January 2017 Dr. Nicole Shephard

This reading list provides an overview of recent books, articles and sources across the internet for those interested in learning more about how race, gender, and sexuality relate to surveillance. Far from comprehensive, it offers a starting point to explore how an intersectional lens and feminist attention to state, corporate, and peer surveillance practices and their differential effects on m...

Global Information Society Watch 2016: Economic, Social and Cultural rights (ESCRs) and the internet
Global Information Society Watch 2016: Economic, Social and Cultural rights (ESCRs) and the internet 14 December 2016 Various

The 46 country reports gathered here illustrate the link between the internet and economic, social and cultural rights (ESCRs). Some of the topics will be familiar to information and communications technology for development (ICT4D) activists: the right to health, education and culture; the socioeconomic empowerment of women using the internet; the inclusion of rural and indigenous communities ...

What steps can Africans take and lead in internet governance and social justice?
What steps can Africans take and lead in internet governance and social justice? 14 December 2016 Ephraim Percy Kenyanito

Almost three years ago, I published a blog post on CircleID titled “Internet Governance: Why Africa Should Take the Lead”. I argued that African internet stakeholders use a “wait and see approach” in matters as critical as internet governance, and that African voices are missing in key internet governance discussion fora. Additionally, I suggested some reasons for this approach, includi...

ARROW for Change: Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet
ARROW for Change: Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet 07 December 2016 The Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women in collaboration with Tactical Technology Collective

What are the relationships and interdependencies influencing the promises of being online: voice, visibility, and power? This ARROW for Change (AFC) issue on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and the internet documents some of these dynamics. Information technologies are now part of the chemistry of activism. The struggle for digital sovereignty and freedoms online are not necess...

Overcoming gender-based digital exclusion in northern Nigeria: A strategy document
Overcoming gender-based digital exclusion in northern Nigeria: A strategy document 06 December 2016 Center for Information Technology and Development (CITAD)

Although in a number of countries the gender dimension of the digital divide has been bridged, this is not so in Nigeria, where there is huge differential between men and women in terms of access to and use of the internet. Within the country, it is worse in the states in the northern parts of the country. This is due to a number of factors including culture, religion, education and attitudes. ...

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