Gender and ICTs

[READING LIST] Gender, Race, Sexuality and Surveillance
[READING LIST] Gender, Race, Sexuality and Surveillance 13 January 2017 Dr. Nicole Shephard

This reading list provides an overview of recent books, articles and sources across the internet for those interested in learning more about how race, gender, and sexuality relate to surveillance.    

Reshaping the internet for women
Reshaping the internet for women 09 January 2017 Flavia Fascendini

During the AWID International Forum in September, the Feminist Exchange Hub hosted the Wikimujeres delegation who provided several spaces around the Whose Knowledge? global campaign, aimed at making the internet truly for, and from, us all.

Internet for Men?: The Digital Marginalisation of Women in Northern Nigeria
Internet for Men?: The Digital Marginalisation of Women in Northern Nigeria 08 January 2017 Y.Z. Ya'u and M.A. Aliyu

This report presents the findings of research aimed at understanding the factors hindering the effective use of the internet by women in northern Nigeria, as part of a project funded with an APC member subgrant.

Economic, social and cultural rights and the internet: The feminist take
Economic, social and cultural rights and the internet: The feminist take 14 December 2016

Does the internet make the realisation of economic, social and cultural rights (ESCRs) a stronger possibility, especially for women and gender nonconforming people? This is the question that the GenderIT.org edition on ESCRs and the internet seeks to answer.

ESC rights, gender and internet: Learnings from the GISWatch report
ESC rights, gender and internet: Learnings from the GISWatch report 09 December 2016

The Global Information Society Watch report last year (GISWatch) dealt explicitly with internet and sexual rights, and this year the report examines the link between economic, social, cultural (ESC) rights and the internet. ESC rights are fundamental to movements that deal with gender – it is women, trans and gender non conforming people who face immense struggle in r...

Algorithmic discrimination and the feminist politics of being in the data
Algorithmic discrimination and the feminist politics of being in the data 09 December 2016 Dr. Nicole Shephard

Image source: Gisela Giardino, Flickr Concern with the role Facebook may or may not have played in swaying the outcome of the U.S.

Beyond the offline-online binary – why women need a new global social contract
Beyond the offline-online binary – why women need a new global social contract 09 December 2016 Anita Gurumurthy

Original artwork by Flavia Fascendini The non-territorial, transborder Internet has overlaid layers of complexity to the human rights debate.

Economic, Social, Cultural Rights and the Internet: The Feminist Take
Economic, Social, Cultural Rights and the Internet: The Feminist Take 09 December 2016 GenderIT.org

Does the internet make the realisation of economic, social, cultural rights a stronger possibility, especially for women and gender nonconforming people? This is the question that our edition on ESC rights and the internet seeks to answer.

ARROW for Change: Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet
ARROW for Change: Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet 07 December 2016 The Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women in collaboration with Tactical Technology Collective

What are the relationships and interdependencies influencing the promises of being online: voice, visibility, and power? This ARROW for Change (AFC) issue on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and the internet documents some of these dynamics.

Digital Storytelling: All our stories are true and they are ours!
Digital Storytelling: All our stories are true and they are ours! 28 November 2016 Jennifer Radloff

Take Back the Tech! campaigners share stories by drawing comics, penning poems, designing graphics, writing blog posts, recording audio, tweeting on hashtags and more. Videos, of course, are popular for storytelling, but how can we approach video-making in a way that ensures our narratives remain our own?