GenderIT.org

Make your own hero
Make your own hero 24 October 2018 Eloisa Diez for GenderIT.org

Meet ARSUKEIL, a non-binary feminist superhero with the power to change the algorithms and give back the data to those from whom it has been taken away by large corporations, created by participants at the Take Back the Tech! camp in Nepal.

Fixing the glitch
Fixing the glitch 24 October 2018 Seyi Akiwowo for GenderIT.org

As an individual and as a public person, as a daughter, sister, friend and if you like, as an activist – self-care, for me, is primarily about setting boundaries in order to flourish. This is something that was heavily emphasised during the Take Back the Tech Camp.

Getting woke about getting laid: A HOLAAfrica sex-positive experience
Getting woke about getting laid: A HOLAAfrica sex-positive experience 18 October 2018 Tiffany Kagure Mugo for GenderIT.org

How to start a sex-positive conversation around queerness, sensuality and sexuality, gender expression, and even violence? HOLAAfrica is one platform that shows us how to do it. From pleasure manuals to podcasts to articles, the platform raises and discusses sensitive issues and concerns.

The politics of self-care and feminism
The politics of self-care and feminism 18 October 2018 Sharanya Sekaram for GenderIT.org

What is self-care in a time of hyper-connected people and devices and of image-saturated capitalism, and what does it mean to speak about self-care in relation to feminist politics and the women's movement? 

Rejecting victimhood: The online speak-out campaign in Kerala against harassment
Rejecting victimhood: The online speak-out campaign in Kerala against harassment 13 October 2018 Praveena Thaali for GenderIT.org

Dalit-Bahujan women in India have increasingly started using the internet and social media to articulate their positions and politics. This article explores how women have combated sexual harassment and exploitation, especially when it takes place in spaces that are considered progressive.

Keywords of the internet: The fraying edges of algorithmic production
Keywords of the internet: The fraying edges of algorithmic production 13 October 2018 Nadège for GenderIT.org

In this column series we unpack keywords relevant to the internet and the digital age. Here we look at algorithms and their origin in the work of Ada Lovelace. At how they are a sequence of steps, how they enfold consequences. And lastly we ask – can we talk about feminist algorithms?

Mentoring women in technology: Laying out the landscape
Mentoring women in technology: Laying out the landscape 09 October 2018 Nodumo Dhlamini for GenderIT.org

Equity in digital access in Africa is far from being a reality. There is also a paucity of women in technology-related careers and more broadly in STEM. Nodumo Dhlamini explores the necessity of mentoring for women to make them confident users and implementers of ICT tools and solutions.

Online dating in Pakistan
Online dating in Pakistan 03 October 2018 Hija Kamran for GenderIT.org

The rise of dating apps allows women to take control of their social life and their choices. Hija Kamran speaks to many women in Pakistan about their experience of online dating, good and bad, whether it allows for challenging of conservative social norms or it leaves women vulnerable to abuse.

Netwoman: Policy and safer internet spaces for women
Netwoman: Policy and safer internet spaces for women 03 October 2018 Rebecca Ryakitimbo for GenderIT.org

With the increase in internet usage in Tanzania, as in much of the world, gaining an online presence is fast becoming a norm. The big question is – how can we make online spaces safer and accessible to women? And what is the image that the internet portrays of women?

Gendered reality traps: How "objective" machine learning contributes to intersectional exploitation
Gendered reality traps: How "objective" machine learning contributes to intersectional exploitation 03 October 2018 Smarika Kumar for GenderIT.org

Is technology neutral or is coding political? In this article Smarika Kumar explores how algorithms work in the real world, and how they are a reflection of existing biases and forms of exclusion and discrimination in society.

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