ICT policy

How could governments get it so wrong?

DHAKA, Bangladesh

"Whatever is the "government" in this glossary). As a general rule, "state" should not be capitalised.

Source: Governance for sustainable human development: A UNDP policy document (Glossary of key terms) and Wikipedia">state

of Source: Wikipedia ">localisation

in India, the "state" in this glossary). As a general rule, "government" should not be capitalised.

Source: Wikipedia">government

is definitely responsible for framing the policies. We have dreams of software superpowerdom, yet basic tools are not in place. They have spent crores (tens of millions by Government of India organisations) CDAC and TDIL, and that too all in the name of undertaking work in Indic computing and benefitting the people," says Ravikant of New Delhi, who has been closely keeping track of Free Software localisation efforts in India.

Changing times... but the same mind-set

DHAKA, Bangladesh

Technology is changing. But the mindset stays the same. And so are the laws. Now, you can start working your The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English on Encyclopedia.com">networking

from a single room. You can start small, keep on deploying, moving out from there, and cover an entire country as you encourage the demand to expand. But is there any recognition to this?

Because the technology has changed, it has a huge impact on how investments will be made, and how the people will use

them.

Asia ICT Policy Meet: Asia ICT Policy is Rising !

DHAKA, Bangladesh

As my preparations are underway for reaching Dhaka for the APC Source: APC">ICT

Policy Meeting, alot of Free Software Foundation ">FOSS

activity is going around within Pakistan as well as around the globe. Its a very busy year for all of us FOSS Advocates, Journalists and Researchers. Its good to see APC's involvement in the South Asian region and it would be great to contribute and co-ordinate APC activities in the region.
Full article

Dhaka Workshop: Issues Coming Out of the Open Space Sessions

Dhaka, Bangladesh

So today, we started the APC Asia Source: APC">ICT

Policy Meeting in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The latter half of the morning and the earlier part of the afternoon was spent in OST (Open Space Technology) to give the participants the opportunity to determine which issues and topics they wanted to spend time discussing...

New report from Sweden

Uppsala, Sweden

A report from the workshop “Post-Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

and Uganda’s Way Forward” (arranged by the Collegium for Development Studies at Uppsala University Sweden, I-Network Uganda, Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET), with support from the Uganda Communications Commission (UCC) and Ministry of Works, Housing and Communications, Uganda) is now available as a pdf, 441kb.


http://www.kus.uu.se/pdf/publications/KUS_Bok28.pdf

48 died and hundreds homeless – FM Radios responsible for disaster

Pakistan

This is horrific tale of two illegal FM Radio stations causing sectarian violence in Khyber Agency, some 40 kilometers from Peshawar, the capital of NWFP province in Pakistan.

UNESCO's Education for All Programme - Put ICTs into Practice

Pakistan

"Progress towards the EFA goals is steady, but too slow in terms of the target dates, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia, and the Arab States" the report emphasizes...

APC Internet Rights Charter

By APC (November 2006, APC )

The APC Internet Rights Charter is available in 20 languages including Urdu, Filipino, Bengali, Bulgarian, Czech, Catalan and Russian.

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Networking? Who? What? Why?

In cyberspace

Michael Gurstein has penned this interesting analysis Networking
the Networked/Closing the Loop: Some Notes on WSIS II
which is available on the archives of the incom-l mailing list. Prof Gurstein, who specialises in community based technology applications, raises critical questions about the "The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English on Encyclopedia.com">networking

opportunities" thrown up by
the WSIS at Tunis.

Looking back, after the show is over

in cyberspace

Coming out in end-November 2005, a Panos London i-Witness update posted via the Global Knowledge for Development network offers a follow-up to the recent Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

. An article from Murali Shanmugavelan in London is titled WSIS is over, but the debate has just begun. Shanmugavelan argues that building an inclusive information society will need civil society to hold governments to account -- and that the media has a crucial role to play in ensuring this happens. There are also href="http://panos.blogs.com/iwitness">"reflections from (some of) our journalists", as Panos puts it.

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