Africa

The case for “open access” in Africa: Mauritius case study

LONDON 26 September 2008 (Russell Southwood for APC)

As other African countries along the SAT-3 submarine internet cable struggle with the high costs of monopolised international bandwidth, Mauritius has encouraged a lowering of prices through price-setting. But Mauritius Telecom had lowered its rates even before the government scale came into effect. The Cyber Island has seen a significant increase in its call centre and outsourcing sectors. Can Mauritius provide lessons to countries that are looking to boost their economies? This study written by Russell Southwood for APC in May, and now available for the first time in French and Portuguese, examines the relationship between international bandwidth prices in Mauritius and the impact of its Cyber Island strategy.

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Why African governments need to listen to the case for "open access" to international communications infrastructure

SAXONWOLD 25 September 2008 (Lisa Thornton for APCNews)

Africa faces two serious challenges regarding internet connectivity – high prices and unreliable connections. The SAT-3/WASC cable, a submarine cable that runs from Portugal to South Africa, has the potential to help alleviate some of the connectivity challenges however, a study released by the APC in May 2008 and now in French and Portuguese written by Abiodun Jagun, reveals that the cable remains largely under-utilised. APCNews talks to Abi Jagun about her findings.

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6th International Conference on Open Access

Location: 
Cross Roads Cresta Hotel
Date and time: 
Nov 12 2008 (All day) - Nov 14 2008 (All day)

Open Access in the context of Communication (Open Communication) means that anyone, on equal conditions with a transparent relation between cost and pricing, can get access to and share communication

Internet in Africa: A well-organised racket

MONTREAL 16 September 2008 (Frédéric Dubois for Alternatives)

Africans pay five to ten times more than Canadians do to access the internet. It is even more costly in rural settings, where a connection is often hard to find. However, what is even more scandalous is the fact that the consumers have no say. A walk on the dark side of the internet.

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GenARDIS Workshop

Location: 
Goree Institute, Goree Island
Date and time: 
Sep 26 2008 (All day) - Sep 30 2008 (All day)

APC and UgaBYTES join forces to evaluate gender and ICTs

BUWAMA 20 August 2008 (Francis Mwathi for UgaBYTES)

On the 6th of August 2008, Dafne Plou, an APC facilitator on the Gender Evaluation Methodology (GEM) with telecentres, visited Uganda on a mission of evaluating how ICTs impact the community within gender lines.

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Software Freedom Day 2008

YAOUNDE 5 August 2008 (Avis Momeni for APCNews)

PROTEGE QV will join the rest of the world over to celebrate the Software Freedom Day 2008 taking place on September 20 2008. The innovation in this year’s free and open source software activities in Yaounde, Cameroon, is that they will be help in an open air setting.

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Connecting South African rural paralegal advice offices

MONTEVIDEO 30 July 2008 (AL for APC)

Ungana-Afrika has for a long time been preaching the importance of bundling capacity building with any technology project. In 2007, they were able to demonstrate the value of this approach through their Rural Connectivity project in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa.

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Putting ICTs to work for Egyptian women artisans

MONTEVIDEO 30 July 2008 (AL for APC)

Handicrafts are an income-generating activity for many women in Egypt, but as producers these women often receive the lowest profit in the trading chain.

Privatisation on its own can be dangerous, workshop told

JOHANNESBURG 29 July 2008 (Alan Finlay for APCNews)

Privatisation without regulation does not necessarily improve service delivery, and may even decrease access to information and communication technology for the poor. This is the view of US-based academic and ICT policy analyst Robert Horwitz, who was speaking at a one-week research workshop held in Johannesburg in July 2008. Horwitz is no newcomer to South Africa, or to the politics behind antennas, cables and wires.

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