Security & privacy

The Shameful Saga of the Internet Ban in Pakistan

Karachi

It was 19th May 2010, when on the orders by Lahore High Court, Government of Pakistan placed a blanket ban on approximately 10,548 websites. From the very outset, we knew that this is NOT the blasphemous content, which is depriving citizens from using Internet and web enabled services.

Pakistani internet ban is excuse to “curb voices against corruption”

ISLAMABAD 8 June 2010 (Bytes For All for APC)

By Sabeen Mahmud.By Sabeen Mahmud.After lifting the nationwide Facebook ban on May 31, the Lahore High Court directed authorities to devise methods to permanently block “blasphemous content” on the internet in Pakistan. “We believe that this order will be misused by the government to block citizens access to online activism and curb voices against corruption and corrupt practices by the government functionaries and that an open internet is essential in the fight for transparency,” says internet rights defender Bytes For All.

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Censorship, sexuality and the internet

MONTEVIDEO 30 April 2010 (APC for APCNews)

The proliferation of sexual content on the internet and the considerable size of the pornography market online is a concern to lots of different groups. However while the online adult sex industry accounts for 12% of web pages, the internet has also been used to express and explore a range of sexual experiences, relationships and content that cannot be considered “harmful”. This kind content is very important to people’s right to freedom of expression and right to information. Especially for people who have little access to resources, rights and spaces in the “off-line” world. Learn more about these issues and the research that APC is doing to understand them better.

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Bytes for All applauds firm Pakistani parliamentarians’ stance on scanning in the USA

ISLAMABAD 8 March 2010 (Shazhad Ahmad for Bytes for All)

While members of the Pakistani parliament were on a diplomatic trip in the United States to talk about the impact of the ar on terror on northern rural tribes in the country, they were asked by airport security in Washington to be body-scanned. The right not to undergo a body scan is a privilege given to parliamentarians the world over. APC member Bytes for All in Pakistan applauds the Pakistani parliamentarians’ firm stance and refusal to be scanned.

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Take Back the Tech!

Location: 
All over the world!
Date and time: 
Nov 25 2010 (All day) - Dec 10 2010 (All day)

During the 16 Days of Activism against Gender Violence each year, the APC WNSP calls for everyone – especially women and grrls – to Take Back the Tech! and reclaim technology for the

MDG3 mid-term assessment and planning meeting

Location: 
Chartfield Guesthouse, Kalk Bay
Date and time: 
Feb 3 2010 (All day) - Feb 5 2010 (All day)

This meeting is part of the MDG3: Strengthening women’s strategic use of ICTs to combat violence against women and girls project run by the APC women’s programme (APC WNSP).

Privacy: More than the right to delete and forget

SHARM EL-SHEIKH 26 November 2009 (Jac sm Kee for GenderIT.org)

Our worlds are increasingly networked and our personal data collected left, right and centre. Ask anyone who has to use a biometric identity card like Malaysian Jac sm Kee who has to give her ID number even if she’s just buying movie tickets online. We can be sure much of the information collected about us online is not that securely warehoused. So what needs to be done to protect our right to privacy online? And what about our own circle? If a boyfriend broadcasts an intimate photo via mobile phone, what then? Jac argues that in the digital age, personal data is no longer just our property, it has become part of who we are. What will be key in the future will be for us to have as much control as possible over our personal data — and that control should be based on “consent” rather than “protection of privacy”.

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Child Protection, Sexuality and Safety Online: Opposing camps

SHARM EL-SHEIKH 26 November 2009 (Indira Maya Ganesh for GenderIT.org)

Research coming out of the UK shows that British children are blasé about putting sexy images of themselves online. But some adults in governments and industry are intent on seeing children as victims where sexuality and the internet is concerned. Why on earth aren’t the powers-that-be actually listening to kids? asks Maya Ganesh reporting from the IGF.

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The APC ICT Policy Handbook (Second edition)

By APC/Ed. David Souter (November 2009, APC )

APC launched our first ICT policy handbook “for beginners” in 2003 to critical acclaim. It was the first comprehensive guide for non-technicians. Now APC has published an entirely rewritten second edition free and online for anyone to download.

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