Open access

Another workshop is possible

CARACAS, Venezuela

If you've ever seen six degrees of separation you may remember the scene where Stockard Channing keeps repeating chaos, control, chaos, control, you like, you like? as she flips a two-sided painting back and forth (I think it's a Kandinsky). I can think of no better way to illustrate the World Social Forum. It's both and neither.

From pre to post capitalist society and we haven't even had lunch yet!

Caracas, Venezuela

A little something for everyone at the World Social Forum...

Networking? Who? What? Why?

In cyberspace

Michael Gurstein has penned this interesting analysis Networking
the Networked/Closing the Loop: Some Notes on WSIS II
which is available on the archives of the incom-l mailing list. Prof Gurstein, who specialises in community based technology applications, raises critical questions about the "The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English on Encyclopedia.com">networking

opportunities" thrown up by
the WSIS at Tunis.

While in Tunis...

Tunis

But I've many interesting experiences at Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

. For example, one evening in

Tunis I was travelling back to my hotel by bus and the lady who was sitting

next to me was talking to me in French. When I've problems explaining

things in French, she started speaking to me in English and informed me

that she used to work with a writer group in USA.

THE CLOSE OF WSIS: The civil society verdict

TUNIS, Tunisia

On the afternoon of Friday, November 18, 2005, one of three stakeholders taking part in the World Summit on the Information Society (Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

) drew a line in the sand. Civil society representatives from all continents lined up to deliver a stark closing statement.

There were civil society thumbs up for the new multistakeholder Internet Governance Forum; the awareness built that people from all walks of life should be involved in APC">ICT policy

development, not just technology specialists and "state" in this glossary). As a general rule, "government" should not be capitalised.

Source: Wikipedia">government

officials; and the spotlight shone on state repression and surveillance in the host nation, Tunisia.

But thumbs were down for: the UN for choosing a flagrant violator of human rights as the hosts of a UN summit; wealthier governments which insist that financing for Handout: ICTs for Development (ICT4D), Multimedia Training Kit (part of APC's ICT policy training curriculum)">ICT for development

should be voluntary only; the vague language on Source: TechSoup Glossary and GenderIT.org">internet

oversight; and the fact that WSIS follow-up will probably be assigned to technology-focused specialist committee.

How the others saw Tunis...

Goa, India

Here are some other voices about how civil society responded to the Tunis
mega-meet over the past week. href="http://www.ipsterraviva.net">IPS/TerraViva has done an interesting
job in highlighting diverse issues. Including href="http://www.ipsterraviva.net/tv/tunis/viewstory.asp?idnews=377">reporting
on how the non-profit world saw the results of the global meet (a
"consolation prize"), href="http://www.ipsterraviva.net/tv/tunis/viewstory.asp?idnews=364">how the NGO world sees the deal on Source: Tunis Agenda for the Information Society">internet governance

("disappointed"), the treatment civil society got in Tunis ("a poor welcome") and some crucial background to understanding the issues involved.

Africa: divide within the divide

Tunis, Tunisia

Only 11% of African people have a fixed line telephone, 12% of African people questioned have a mobile telephone, less than 3% have an Style information: Do not use e-mail with a hyphen.

Source: Wikipedia">email

address...So says a new study conducted by RIA. Although one of the Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

's main objectives is to decrease the digital divide, 80% of African people today do not have access to any form of communication service. A shocking statistic is that 15% of African people who were questioned would have preferred to buy a cellular telephone than a refrigerator! In Francophone African countries, the statistics, with the exception of Senegal, are worse.

Snapshot: Ana María Ponce (.pe)

Tunis, Tunisia

She's a Peruvian heading towards The Mountain Forum in Nepal. The forum is particularly created as a medium of alternative communication for mountainous areas, which is why, since its conception, it has specifically used the Source: TechSoup Glossary and GenderIT.org">internet

as a communication tool between the participating people and communities that constitute the different nodes.

Cost of accessing WSIS II

Had some conversations yesterday, and I thought I would share what I have found out in terms of some cost of participating in this event....I am wondering how much the total cost of building up these sprawling white tents cost, or hiring of the buses for the shuttle service, the planting of the trees, the printing of the Tunisian President’s picture to grace the streets… and I wonder how the payment for this eventually trickles down to you, me and the countless people who have no idea of what Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

is about, nor have a chance to care.

Voices from Africa, HANA

cyberspace

Highway Africa runs the Highway Africa News Agency. (Interestingly, its work is put out under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License.) They've got some interesting stories in their e-despatch which just reached mailboxes earlier today.One story is about African delegates boast of ICT success stories. Perhaps the most catchy title is No teeth but can still chew the fat and it's a radio script for a radio report on the Internet Governance Forum and who controls the Source: TechSoup Glossary and GenderIT.org">internet

...You need to login to access these stories, but there's no commercial barrier (or, unvoluntary sign-up fee) needed to gain access.

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