open spectrum

Spectrum regulation in Argentina: The need to move from broadcasting to access

12 December 2011 (Nodo Tau for APC)

Argentina is one of only three countries in the world that privatised spectrum. However the recent renationalisation of its control, together with the participative drafting of a new radio broadcasting law and a national plan for internet access, make this an auspicious time

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A key moment for getting spectrum in the public agenda in Peru

12 December 2011 (CEPES for APC)

Opportunities are emerging in the Peruvian political scenario to liberalise spectrum frequencies for open and community use. However academic institutions and civil society must participate get more involved in the policy and project debates say Maicu Alvarado y Gabriela Perona in a new report for APC.

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The need to build alliances in Ecuador for better spectrum use and regulation

15 November 2011 (CIESPAL for APC)

Ecuador’s new constitution has created opportunities for democratising the spectrum based on a renewed vision of rights, and clearer definitions of the competencies required by the bodies that formulate policy and regulations. The priority now are civil society discussions on the legal reforms the new constitution demands says Marco Navas Alvear.

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Finding a balance in spectrum regulation in Venezuela

15 November 2011 (EsLaRed for APC)

Venezuela’s socialist development model has brought about significant changes favouring the democratisation of spectrum say Sandra Benítez and Ermanno Pietrosemoli in a new study for APC. But doubts remain about who will loosen the private sector’s grip on the sector. Civil society plays a key watchdog role to ensure that the steps taken benefit the state, rather than the government of the day.

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APC publishes new issue paper on spectrum for development

CALGARY 20 October 2011 (LC for APCNews)

A new issue paper by South Africa-based ICT expert Steve Song for APC explains how wirless is crucial to bridging the digital divide. This article summarises some of the key points of his paper which is available for download.

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TV white spaces can open up low-cost high-speed internet across Africa: All we need is the regulatory go-ahead

JOHANNESBURG 13 October 2011 (KAH for APCNews)

“We have the skills, the entrepreneurs, a spectrum model we can replicate, the standards, the technology and clearly we have the demand” said South African Henk Kleynhans in the wake of a TV white spaces workshop in Johannesburg last week. “All we need is a regulatory go-ahead.”

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Spectrum for development

By Steve Song (September 2011, APC )

When talking about affordable, ubiquitous access to communication in developing countries, wireless technologies offer the most hope for effectively bridging the digital divide. This paper examines its challenges and opportunities.

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TV white space spectrum workshop looks at Kenya and South Africa

JOHANNESBURG 10 August 2011 (APC for APCNews)

Unused TV white spaces could be the way to get highspeed wireless internet to millions living outside major African cities. Manufacturers are gearing up for mass production of white space devices and now is the time to act. APC and partners are coordinating an important workshop for govt officials, regulators and professionals in October.

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Open spectrum for development: Brazil case study

By Carlos Afonso, with collaboration from Jonas Valente (March 2011, APC )

For about 75 years up to the sixties, nearly all telecommunications services in the country were in private hands, distributed among hundreds of local operators. Telephony authorizations were issued and controlled by the state governments. In this process Companhia Telefônica Brasileira (CTB, a subsidiary of the Canadian company Brazilian Traction) emerged as a major operator of local and long-distance services in the majority of the larger Brazilian cities, covering about 80% of the telephone terminals in the country. CTB shared the market in these cities with Companhia Telefônica Nacional, CTN, an ITT3 subsidiary. The remaining cities and towns were covered by small local operators in extremely precarious situations.

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