ICT for development

From Sri Lanka, impatient with "pilots"...

Goa, India

Sri Lankan journalist Nalaka Gunawardene has this interestingly-argued piece Waiting for Pilots to Land in Tunis on the IslamOnline.net site, that has some blunt questions to ask around the question: "Are Pilot Projects Helping Development".

While in Tunis...

Tunis

But I've many interesting experiences at Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

. For example, one evening in

Tunis I was travelling back to my hotel by bus and the lady who was sitting

next to me was talking to me in French. When I've problems explaining

things in French, she started speaking to me in English and informed me

that she used to work with a writer group in USA.

The forgotten agenda...

cyberspace

With the focus at Tunis largely on who controls the Net, and the
far-from-sophisticated control mechanisms of Tunisian society, the issue of
what the Net can -- and is -- doing for the excluded in the planet might
have taken a back seat. Disparity in accessing the levers of communication is markedly sharp. But interesting stories are coming in about what's possible from various parts of the globe -- href="http://www.ipsterraviva.net/tv/tunis/viewstory.asp?idnews=385">Africa, in the field of education, href="http://www.ipsterraviva.net/tv/tunis/viewstory.asp?idnews=383">the American Indian indigenous people, and beyond. Undeniably, the harsh reality needs to be acknowledged and dealt with too....

Africa: divide within the divide

Tunis, Tunisia

Only 11% of African people have a fixed line telephone, 12% of African people questioned have a mobile telephone, less than 3% have an Style information: Do not use e-mail with a hyphen.

Source: Wikipedia">email

address...So says a new study conducted by RIA. Although one of the Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

's main objectives is to decrease the digital divide, 80% of African people today do not have access to any form of communication service. A shocking statistic is that 15% of African people who were questioned would have preferred to buy a cellular telephone than a refrigerator! In Francophone African countries, the statistics, with the exception of Senegal, are worse.

Snapshot: Ana María Ponce (.pe)

Tunis, Tunisia

She's a Peruvian heading towards The Mountain Forum in Nepal. The forum is particularly created as a medium of alternative communication for mountainous areas, which is why, since its conception, it has specifically used the Source: TechSoup Glossary and GenderIT.org">internet

as a communication tool between the participating people and communities that constitute the different nodes.

Voices from Africa, HANA

cyberspace

Highway Africa runs the Highway Africa News Agency. (Interestingly, its work is put out under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License.) They've got some interesting stories in their e-despatch which just reached mailboxes earlier today.One story is about African delegates boast of ICT success stories. Perhaps the most catchy title is No teeth but can still chew the fat and it's a radio script for a radio report on the Internet Governance Forum and who controls the Source: TechSoup Glossary and GenderIT.org">internet

...You need to login to access these stories, but there's no commercial barrier (or, unvoluntary sign-up fee) needed to gain access.

$100 laptop: hope or hype?

cyberspace

Prototypes for a $100 laptop for Third World schools are out... what does it look like? What can it do? Is there a catch? And, hangon, there is still discussion on whether the Source: TechSoup Glossary and GenderIT.org">internet

is a friend or foe of education....

Feel the difference@ICT4All Exhibition

Tunis, Tunisia

There are five different sections, by themes, at the ICT4All Exhibition, but I would divide them in my own five categories. These categories are corporates, NGOs, governments, international organizations and Tunisians. A report from one far corner of the floor (literally) of the exhibition.

Women in pink at WSIS II

On the first day, I was so desperate to see women at this space because of the overbearing presence of men, especially those in uniformed and are armed. When I scanned around, I saw mainly (apart from the participants) women in pink who were cleaners and usually hauled big bags of rubbish with them...

Email addresses get a face ... finally

Tunis

For me, 15th November@Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.">WSIS

, by far, was the most interesting and useful day since am here. It was great indeed, when many more Style information: Do not use e-mail with a hyphen.

Source: Wikipedia">email

addresses in my address book finally got a face ;)

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