GISWatch 2012 : Focus on the internet and corruption

JOHANNESBURG 29 October 2012 (APC for GISWatch)

GISWatch 2012 explores how the internet is being used to ensure transparency and accountability, the challenges that civil society activists face in fighting corruption, and when the internet fails as an enabler of a transparent and fair society.

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South Sudan: The #OSJUBA event stresses early moves by net activists

Imagine a city torn by war, overwhelmed with daily influx of people from the countryside, becoming the capital of a country from one day to the next. And then picture crazy computer people ruffled together in an abandoned supermarket, thousands of kilometres away, in another city, trying to fix the first city. These two images put together are called #OSJUBA. OS for open source and Juba for the capital of the latest country in the world, South Sudan.

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UPR of South Africa: Connecting the right to communication to women's rights

South Africa’s constitution guarantees freedom of expression and has been interpreted to include the right to community media and to creative journalistic content. However, online media and its regulation fall short.

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Human rights and the internet - A review of perceptions in human rights organisations

By David Souter (March 2012, APC )

This report, commissioned by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), is concerned with the relationship between human rights and the internet; and with perceptions of the internet, its impact on human rights and the concept of internet rights within mainstream rights organisations. It pays particular attention to the rights encapsulated in Articles 18, 19 and 20 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (freedoms of conscience, expression and association). The study forms part of APC’s work on internet rights and freedom of expression and, in particular, the “Internet rights are human rights” project.

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Freedom of expression and the Internet: How to reconcile practice and principles?

GENEVA 22 May 2012 (ITU)

Watch the full (and very dynamic) discussion that took place in Geneva on May 17. Five seasoned human rights defenders faced off on the specific right to freedom of expression and how it relates to the internet. How to reconcile practice and principles when it comes to freedom of expression on the net? Anyone?

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Must read: The internet, human rights and the UPR

GENEVA 22 May 2012 (Joy Liddicoat for APC)

This must-read Q&A is a great resource on how the internet and human rights are related. This short catch-all article summarises the “why” behind APC’s efforts to have the internet recognised as a very powerful enabler of human rights. It’s the one article you should read to dig into what’s happening at the UN in Geneva this week.

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Freedom of expression and the internet: How to reconcile practice and principles?

MONTREAL 4 May 2012 (FD for APCNews)

How do we reconcile theory and practice when it comes to freedom of expression and the internet? From May 14 to 18, Geneva will be hosting the WSIS Forum 2012, where the Association for Progressive Communications has organised two thematic workshops, one of them about freedom of expression and the internet.

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UK: Radical phone and Internet monitoring proposal to be put to parliament


Press release
2 April 2012

Reporters Without Borders strongly condemns a bill allowing monitoring of all phone calls, text messages, emails and other electronic communications that the British government plans to submit to parliament in the coming weeks.

“We are shocked to hear more and more supposedly democratic countries such as India, France, Australia and now the United Kingdom express

ICT Policy in Africa and the Internet and Human Rights

In this post, I am going to address two main issues: the need and role of ICT policy in Africa, and the relationship between Internet and human rights. The landscape of ICTs probably is the fastest growing sector ever experienced with any medium or any transformative technology.

Which way African ICT Policy? Turn right, human right

“He is as useless as a dog” this was part of a Facebook post by a young Kenyan photographer on the wall of a Kenyan politician, Mr. Lewis Nguyai. The Facebook post has since led to the photographer’s arrest and may ultimately result in a defamation suit. Kenya’s National Cohesion and Integration Commission (NCIC) which was set up after the post election violence in 2008 to “promote equality of opportunity, good relations, harmony and peaceful coexistence between persons of different ethnic and racial backgrounds in Kenya” claims that they received 60 complaints in February 2012 regarding defamatory comments made about individuals on social media web sites. In most countries defamation is entrenched in local laws and mostly predicated on Article 11 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which guarantees legal protection against “attacks upon … honour and reputation”.

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