Gender & ICTs

At the cutting edge: TBTT campaigner Francoise Mukuku in DRC

South Africa

Take Back The Tech! celebrates 10 years of working with grassroots movements around the world to take control of technology to end violence against women. Throughout the year Take Back the Tech!

Trafficking in women: Female objectification

Brazil

96% of people interviewed in an unprecedented national survey believe that women are being trafficked in Brazil, and 82% estimate that it takes place in their own town. These results dismiss the prevailing belief that human trafficking is an urban legend or a fictional subject from a famous Brazilian soap opera.

Reshaping the internet for women

9 January 2017 (Flavia Fascendini for APCNews)

Even in 2015 the contribution by women to Wikipedia, one of the largest repositories online of organised knowledge about the world, had not reached 25% of the total. Most of the content online comes from the global North, specifically from white male contributors in North America. What needs to be done to ensure diversity, localisation and gender parity in content online? APCNews speaks to Anasuya Sengupta and Siko Bouterse from Whose Knowledge? project to find out more.

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Economic, Social, Cultural Rights and the Internet: The Feminist Take

14 December 2016 (GenderIT.org)

Does internet technology make the realisation of economic, social, cultural rights a stronger possibility, especially for women and gender nonconforming people? This is the question that the GenderIT.org edition on ESC rights and the internet seeks to answer. The GISWatch report on ESC rights looks at various contexts around the world of how the internet has acted largely as an enabler for ESC rights, and sometimes as a dis-abler or rather a selective enabler, that widens the gaps around existing axis of social and economic difference.

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Economic, Social, Cultural Rights and the Internet: The Feminist Take

Does the internet make the realisation of economic, social, cultural rights a stronger possibility, especially for women and gender nonconforming people? This is the question that our edition on ESC rights and the internet seeks to answer.

Beyond the offline-online binary – why women need a new global social contract

Original artwork by Flavia FascendiniOriginal artwork by Flavia Fascendini The non-territorial, transborder Internet has overlaid layers of complexity to the human rights debate.

Algorithmic discrimination and the feminist politics of being in the data

Image source: Gisela Giardino, FlickrImage source: Gisela Giardino, Flickr Concern with the role Facebook may or may not have played in swaying the outcome of the U.S.

ESC rights, gender and internet: Learnings from the GISWatch report

Image depicts China’s popular vlogger Papi JiangImage depicts China’s popular vlogger Papi Jiang The Global Information Society Watch report last year (GISWatch) dealt explicitly with internet and sexual rights, and this year the report examines the “link between economic, social, cultural (ESC) rights and the

ARROW for Change: Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet

By The Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women in collaboration with Tactical Technology Collective (January 2016, )

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Digital Storytelling: All our stories are true and they are ours!

29 November 2016 (Jennifer Radloff for GenderIT.org)

“It is a revolutionary act to take control of our voices and the technology to speak of our own lives,” says Jennifer Radloff in this article for GenderIT.org, in which she explains the methodology, the process, and the importance of digital storytelling. For the full stories, visit our new digital storytelling platform at stories.apc.org!

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