Access to information

A blog, plus audio, from Geneva

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND 28 September 2005 (APCNews)

Podcasting hasn’t yet caught on among the alternate circuit but Partha Pratim Sarker of BytesForAll got off to a quick start at Geneva. At the Prepcom 3 events, Sarkar took along recording equipment to do what he described as a "sort of audio blogging with an RSS feed". APC’s Lenka Simerska, on hearing it, commented: "Cool blog, really! I find it useful and refreshing to use combination of written word and voice. I had a problem to listen though… But on second try it worked well." Podcasting is a method of publishing audio programmes via the Internet, allowing users to subscribe to a feed of new files (usually MP3s). It first became popular in late 2004.

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New APC Issue Paper: Interconnection costs

PORT ELIZABETH, SOUTH AFRICA 27 September 2005 (APCNews)

Communication infrastructures are changing at such an accelerated pace that while new technologies are released continuously, we are still ignorant about questions of internet interconnection. While the users of the North reap the benefits brought about by information and communication technologies’ advances, the users of the South are increasingly prevented from taking advantage of the innovations. Leading among the many factors, the privatisation of this sector’s operations in the industrialised countries and the adoption of new technologies have reduced the financial flows of the network towards the developing world. Available in English and Spanish.

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Cantennas, taking wi-fi to rural areas. Affordably.

25 September 2005 (Russell Southwood)

A "Cantenna"? What’s that? It’s a solution that comes out of using empty tin cans and other simple tools that a lot of communities can afford. "Cantenna" technology can make wireless connection cheaper for poorly served rural areas and economically disadvantaged African people who do not have access to Internet connectivity. This is what emerges from a report on an APC-run series of capacity-building workshops in Africa.

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Loband, taking the Net to areas where connectivity is still slow

14 September 2005

It is free, open-source, contains no advertising and runs online so there is nothing to download. Loband works by displaying any website with the original text and layout but with after removing un-necessary adverts, images and web objects such as Flash animations. Its promoters call this a "unique simplification and compression process (which) can reduce access time by up to ten times". Loband is perfect for speeding up browsing and searching on the internet, making it cheaper and less frustrating. It potentially allows internet access where it was impossible before. The newly released v2.0 supports more websites, including ones featuring international character sets. Send feedback to feedback@aidworld.org For a demo of APC’s Spanish homepage through Loband, see this link.

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Franco-Brazil civil society exchange notes

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL 19 August 2005 (RITS Brazil)

When civil society from Brazil and France got together recently, they focussed on exchanging "experiences in digital solidarity". Their mid-July meet in Paris saw them also look at the possibility of cooperation in fields like Free and Open Source Software (FOSS).

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Update: When cyberspace goes to Amazonia...

SANTARÉM, BRAZIL 3 August 2005 (Rits)

What happens when wireless, Free Software and the internet reaches the Amazon? APC’s member in Brazil, RITS, gives an update of their project in Pará, a territory covered mostly by jungle, and the Amazon Rainforest.

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Ungana-Afrika: Doing its bit to counter Africa's 'capacity crisis'

GOA, INDIA 29 June 2005 (APCNews)

APC’s new member Ungana-Afrika is a non-profit organisation that provides technology support, and helps others initiate technology support programs, within the development community of Southern Africa. Their work includes incubation of ICT capacity building programs, in-house ICT programs, and individual projects.

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SANGONeT takes a closer look at the WSIS

SOUTH AFRICA 8 June 2005 (SANGONeT)

Local content; community broadcasting; freedom of expression, diversity and pluralism; financing the digital divide; education and ICT literacy; and gender and ICTs — what role should these issues play at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS)? In South Africa, a June-end 2005 meet seeks to provide an opportunity for civil society organisations (CSOs) to reflect on WSIS issues.

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IL FAIT BON VIVRE EN TUNISIE? The state of human rights in Tunisia, host of the next World Summit on the Information Society

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND 1 April 2005 (Maud Hand)

Attendees at the recent phase of WSIS couldn’t fail to notice the prolific presence of Tunisian delegates. From civil society plenaries through gatherings over coffee to the government sessions, they had their say in preparation for the November summit. But can a country whose government censors journalists, curtails web access and imprisons internet users without trial, be a fit host for the UN’s World Summit on the Information Society? Maud Hand seeks answers to one of the hottest questions of Prepcom 2 for APCNews.

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Multi-stakeholder participation and ICT policy processes

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND 1 April 2005 (Anriette Esterhuysen)

The complexity of the WSIS process has been discussed extensively. But APC executive director Anriette Esterhuysen questions whether the WSIS is uniquely complex. In this article for APCNews she explores multistakeholder participation in policy processes, particularly at national level, and examines consensus and conflict in the WSIS civil society space and why the issue of collaboration with the private sector has become so contentious.

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