Access to information

Creating spaces for civil society in WSIS

TUNIS, TUNISIA 31 January 2006 (Willie Currie)

The interventions of civil society activists made a material difference to the outcomes of WSIS in Tunis, contents Willie Currie, the ICT (Information and Communication Technology) Policy Manager with the Association for Progressive Communications (APC).

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WOUGNET, Uganda: Meet to consolidate WSIS achievements, attain targets

GOA, INDIA 31 January 2006 (APCNews)

APC-member WOUGNET in Uganda was one of the organisers of a conference in mid-December, on a post-World Summit on Information Society (WSIS) consolidation for Uganda. This conference aimed at strengthening what happened at WSIS and finding a concrete way forward to meet the WSIS targets at the national level. Specially, establishing national priorities and benchmarks.

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APC study on developing country and non-governmental actors' role in WSIS

GOA, INDIA 24 January 2006 (APCNews)

APC is undertaking a study of the participation of ‘developing’ countries and non-government actors — including civil society — in the recent World Summit on the Information Society and its associated fora, such as the Task Force on Financing Mechanisms and the Working Group on Internet Governance. It is being coordinated by Professor David Souter, of ict Development Associates ltd and University of Strathclyde.

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Mainstreaming ICTs in Africa, a new book is out

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA 23 January 2006 (Women'sNet)

‘Mainstreaming ICTs: Africa Lives the Information Society" is a contribution towards efforts to bridge the "policy-practice" divide. The book is amied at development practitioners and ICT innovators interested in inventive technology applications for social justice and development. It contains 10 case studies reflecting on the innovative and creative ways information and communciation technologies (ICTs) have been used to promote people-centred development in a number of Sub-Saharan African countries. The book was compiled and edited by Women’sNet with the assistance of a Southern African editorial group including Toni Eliasz, Ria Greyling, Benter Okello, Muroro Dziruni, Ashraf Patel, and Natasha Primo. The project was supported by the Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa (OSISA).

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Abusing numbers: is Korea going just too far?

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA 13 December 2005 (Oh Byoung-il)

The Korean Progressive Network Jinbonet is currently conducting a study on the state of Korean National ID Number System. Its aim: to demo problems of Korean National ID Number System by contrasting how the same is abused in Korea, and comparing with cases of foreign countries. If you can answer some short questions by December 15, 2005, it would help the study immensely.

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Open Letter to His Excellency Kofi A. Annan Secretary-General United Nations

26 November 2005 (Signatories)

This week in Tunis, at the World Summit on the Information Society, both inside and outside the official Summit, we have witnessed serious attacks on human rights and the right to freedom of expression. Please sign the open letter to Kofi Annan today.

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The same old strangers

TUNIS, TUNIS 17 November 2005 (Dafne Plou, APC women\'s programme)

Why is that the police who want to look like an average citizen look alike all around the world? Why do they cut their hair and comb it the same way? Why do they use the same black glasses and same gold chains? Why do they like those tropical shirts that in the long run become a uniform? In Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro, Santiago, Tegucigalpa or Tunisia, they are instantly identifiable.

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WSIS: In the face of police repression, civil society cancels activities

TUNIS, TUNISIA 15 November 2005 (Markus Beckedahl)

Many international NGOs taking part in the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) have collectively decided to cancel their activities planned for today, November 15, at WSIS. This measure is to make government, private sector and civil society delegates aware of the human rights violations that have been adding up over the last two days including beatings of journalists by police and the breaking-up of meetings since November 13. It is also a clear showing of solidarity with all independent NGOs in Tunisia who seem to have to put up with police repression on a daily basis. Markus Beckedahl interviewed APC’s Anriette Esterhuysen on the reasons for this drastic decision. Listen to the interview.

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Who will control the internet? Negotiations appear to be pointing towards a multi-stakeholder, multi-lateral forum

TUNIS, TUNISIA 15 November 2005 (APCNews)

Heated discussions between governments meeting in Tunisia at the World Summit on the Information Society seems to reaching results which could change the face of how the internet is managed for the next several years. APCNews reports.

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Flagrant violation of human rights this morning alongside UN summit

14 November 2005
TUNIS, TUNISIA 14 November 2005 () -

Under the incredulous eyes of the participants at the World Summit on the Information Society (Style information: When using the acronym, do not use the definite article, i.e. write “at WSIS” rather than “at the WSIS”.

Source: APC ICT Policy Handbook and APC Annual Report 2005.”>WSIS), journalists and human rights defenders were manhandled, insulted, and then violently beaten.

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