privacy

Big Brother comes of age

Ottawa

Not to be outdone by their neighbours to the south, Canada is now a late entry to the Big Brother Awards.

Parents use Facebook to spy on their kids

A recent study found that over half of parents use social networking sites to spy on their children. In most cases this included monitoring their status updates, looking at their wall and even creeping their pictures.

Uncool, dad.

For the Lulz!


I’ve been a Twitter follower (aka ‘cyber-groupie’) of LulzSec for a little over a week and I can’t decide whether I’m amused, scared, or just plain aroused.

Facebook just got creepier


Like that guy who sits right next to you on the bus even though every other seat is free, the people at Facebook are once again “all up in your business”:http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9217447/Facebook_stirs_privacy_ire_with_facial_recognition.

APC successfully hosts event on freedom of expression -- sandwiches were delicious.

To the best of my knowledge there were no casualties.

Today APC hosted its event at the Human Rights Council’s 17th session. The event, which focused on freedom of expression on the internet, featured speakers from across the world — including special guest Frank La Rue, the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression.

APC member JCA-NET speaks out against Japanese digital surveillance bill

MONTEVIDEO 30 May 2011 (APC for APCNews)


The proposed bill criminalises a number of online activities, granting Japanese authorities extremely broad powers to monitor and investigate their citizens. It also requires network providers to record and hold communications data on all users so it can be used by law enforcement agencies.

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US Senate debates reforms to Electronic Communications Privacy Act

Senator Patrick Leahy, author of the original 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act, has proposed several amendments to the ECPA in order to “keep pace with new technologies and new threats to our security”.

United States goes for the high score


According to the Justice Department, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court — the oversight body established to approve or deny surveillance requests in the United States — “approved 100% of such requests”:http://arstechnica.com/

Sony Network Suffers Massive Intrusion

Sony announced yesterday that the PlayStation Network was currently down.

As if we hadn’t noticed.

A Chinese Facebook?


Mark Zuckerberg’s latest trip to China appears to have borne fruit. You know — that unidentifiable spiky fruit you just bought at the Chinese grocery store and now you’re not sure which part you’re supposed to eat.

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