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“The Burden of The Struggle” - Engendering change in ICT policy

DHAKA, BANGLADESH 26 April 2006 (Cheekay Cinco)

Cheekay Cinco, member of APC WNSP, interviews Nancy Hafkin, woman pioneer of networking and ICTs development in Africa on her thoughts about the current gender and ICT policy environment. She reflects on the WSIS process and the recent Commission on the Status of Women, and articulates what is urgently needed to render visible the gender dimensions of ICTs at policy levels.

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21st century maxim: the personal is political in the Korean blogging world

DHAKA, BANGLADESH 26 April 2006 (FN)

“There’s power in getting people to talk. When voices get online, and can express themselves, this in itself unleashes a whole new chemistry.” Hana Kim – better known by her cyberidentity as ‘Dalgun’ – clearly understands the relevance of her work. Soft-spoken Dalgun is part of the APC-member Korean progressive network Jinbonet (jinbo.net). She talks about the tactics she is involved with to get youngsters to blog. APCNews has met her in Dhaka, Bangladesh in mid-April.

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Pakistan: Electronic Data Protection Act 2005 (Final Draft)

Pakistan

Pakistan Software Export Board (PSEB), a government entity has drafted “Electronic Data Protection Act 2005” by outsourcing the work to an individual Mr. Aslam Hayat Khan. As per PSEB, the proposed Act aims to prevent unauthorized access and theft of electronic data and to ensure intellectual property rights with regards to the processing of electronic data in Pakistan.

For South Asia, an intended FOSS bridge

GOA, India

Here’s an early initiative to flow out of the APC South Asia Consultation: BytesForAll has just launched a new mailing list, specifically focused on Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS, or FOSS). Details of the group are below. We invite all interested to join.

Of Hammers and Nails

Dhaka, Bangladesh

“When a hammer is all you have, everything begins to look like a nail…

Underwater cables, unseen issues?

DHAKA, Bangladesh

Colombo-based Professor Rohan Samarajiva : "As civil society organisations, we tend to forget the less obvious things. Like submarine cables. But these are things that have massive payoffs. You need to be a bit opportunistic about it (while campaigning on that)."

Questioning ICT myths

DHAKA, Bangladesh

Can a lack of information be solved simply by setting up telecentres? Should poor-governance sought to be sorted out just by building e-governance? And, if the problem is a lack of market information, can this be met merely by building up e-commerce portals?

How could governments get it so wrong?

DHAKA, Bangladesh

"Whatever is the state of localisation in India, the government is definitely responsible for framing the policies. We have dreams of software superpowerdom, yet basic tools are not in place. They have spent crores (tens of millions by Government of India organisations) CDAC and TDIL, and that too all in the name of undertaking work in Indic computing and benefitting the people," says Ravikant of New Delhi, who has been closely keeping track of Free Software localisation efforts in India.

You're right. Copyright is wrong.

DHAKA, Bangladesh

It is assumed that everyone who buys a cheap illegally-copied ("pirated") copy of music or software CD would actually buy


the costly ‘official’ version. Links have been made by piracy and terrorism, which are actually quite ludicrous. ‘Intellectual property’ is used as a term, instead of ‘creative expression’. When something is called property, we are stealing, poaching and pirating. Instead of what we should be really see it as being — sharing, creating and enhancing cultural products.

Changing times... but the same mind-set

DHAKA, Bangladesh

Technology is changing. But the mindset stays the same. And so are the laws. Now, you can start working your networking from a single room. You can start small, keep on deploying, moving out from there, and cover an entire country as you encourage the demand to expand. But is there any recognition to this?


Because the technology has changed, it has a huge impact on how investments will be made, and how the people will use


them.

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